SES recruiting

Discussion of the SES, particularly in the UK.
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a different guest
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SES recruiting

Postby a different guest » Sat Feb 05, 2005 3:32 am

And supposedly they tidyed up their act. They have been running ads all week (again) - they are quite big ads in the major daily paper and I know from experience those ads don't come cheap. Here's the wording...
PHILOSOPHY
the love and application of wisdom

The course is offered for the interest and enjoyment of thoughtful men and women who seek an understanding of the nature of human existance and the world in which we live.

Drawing on the great philosophic ideas of both east and west, past and present, this course, with ample opportunity for discussion, explores the meaning of wisdom, truth, consciousness, the real nature of Humanity and what inhibits its development.

It is for all, regardless of education, age, race, political or religiious beleifs. It is practical philosophy. The principles discussed can be put into effective practical use in work, study and every aspect of daily life. In lter terms the oportunity to practice meditation will be offered
Last edited by a different guest on Thu Feb 17, 2005 11:47 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Postby a different guest » Mon Feb 14, 2005 10:52 pm

and perhaps they are recruiting thru the primary schools as well? The melb school - erasmus - makes NO mention of its SES connections, but new parents are

invited to attend a series of informative workshops where you can find out more about our unique curriculum and the philosophy on which the school is founded.


and while this accolade from a parent makes NO mention of the SES, he says
the children get the opportunity to practice meditation. I recognise through my own practice how meditation is able to quieten the mind and provide a sense of peace.


obviously SES - was he SES before his child started at the school? or did he join later?

shonarose
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Not necessarily.

Postby shonarose » Tue Feb 15, 2005 7:12 pm

a different guest wrote:obviously SES - was he SES before his child started at the school? or did he join later?


Lots of people who have nothing to do with SES practice meditation or consider it to be beneficial!

In fact I'm sure this is something that attracts non-SES parents, e.g. children from Indian families or others where the parents have an interest in meditation, 'alternative' approaches to schooling, or eastern mysticism (we had some Sri Chinmoy pupils during my time there).

They just arent aware about the restricted education, sexism and bizarre philosophy that are also part of the package ......

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Postby a different guest » Tue Feb 15, 2005 10:11 pm

I concede it is a possibility shona - but if you read the full testimonial I have my doubts. The school is very small (120 kids) and the parents live "halfway across Melbourne" from it. How on earth would they have heard about the school? The claim in the testimonial is that his wife saw the kids on an excursion in the Botanical Gardens and was impressed with their behaviour - which all seems a bit far fetched to me. His testimonial also has some VERY familiar phrasing like " to learn the wisdom of the ages" when mentioning the philosphy study.

another worrying aspect is that the parent mentions a "pledge" system of payment - where instead of paying money they can "contribute" to the fees by work. Isn't that the sort of thing the scientologists do? Is it common in the SES?

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Postby adrasteia » Tue Feb 15, 2005 10:39 pm

a different guest wrote: ...another worrying aspect is that the parent mentions a "pledge" system of payment - where instead of paying money they can "contribute" to the fees by work. Isn't that the sort of thing the scientologists do? Is it common in the SES?


I'm don't know about it in terms of the St. James Schools, but one thing that has always struck me is the duties the Ses women are given- where do the ladies who perform the meditiation checks on the girls come from, and those women who used to do gardening when the school's premises were in Notting Hill Gate? Then, sixth form students in the youth group help to clean Mr. Lambi's house etc. as weekly chores.
The ties that bind.

shonarose
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Postby shonarose » Tue Feb 15, 2005 10:54 pm

It was very common.

When my parents were having trouble raising the fees my mother worked at St Vedast to pay them off. I'm sure that the majority of the women who prepared lunch for us, gardened, etc were either volunteers (possibly as part of their SES 'duties') or were parents in this situation.

As for cleaning - well, the children did most of this of course! Much scrubbing of floors.

The number of people who were employed by or did work for the school in any capacity, who were not SES members, was kept to an absolute minimum.

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Postby a different guest » Sun Feb 27, 2005 9:08 am

The number of people who were employed by or did work for the school in any capacity, who were not SES members, was kept to an absolute minimum.


and perhaps non-existant in the Australian/NZ schools? For instance, unlike the current St james ALL the teachers at these schools are SES.

daska
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Postby daska » Sun Feb 27, 2005 8:44 pm

I can't speak for more recently than a couple of years but there were at that point a lot of spanish speaking employees in the kitchens at Olympia and I'm not at all sure that they are all in SES - or at least if they are they haven't got to the 'if you wear jeans you're no better than a prostitute' bit. The woman who runs the kitchens would appear to have SES running through her like a stick of rock. Shona, was it your mum at Sarum, if so I remember well, she was lovely and one of the few people I can think on with only positive memories! I can think of some other mums (better not bandy names around though) who were chained to the yoghourt cupboards in payment of school fees, I wonder if they all still think it was worth it!? Anyone know?

lowpass
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Postby lowpass » Sun Feb 27, 2005 11:07 pm

aaarrgh the yoghurt cupboards!!!! forgot about those....!

daska
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Postby daska » Sun Feb 27, 2005 11:10 pm

and the yoghourt skin...

yeuch

Alban
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Postby Alban » Mon Feb 28, 2005 12:17 am

A number of boys were caned for either adding honey, or removing the "skin", although at half an inch thick, I'm not sure it is a fitting description. I do remember getting my own back on one of the teachers by skimming all the skin off the top of the bowl and dumping it into his cup - then covering it off with the minutest amount of "real" yoghurt. To his credit he got through it without throwing up, and all he could say was "my that was very rich".


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