How well does SES live up to its own aims?

Discussion of the SES, particularly in the UK.
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bonsai
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Location: London

Postby bonsai » Fri Jun 09, 2006 9:02 am

Free wrote:It will be very difficult for the Governors to make a break with SES, for they are all quite indoctrinated with the 'Truth', which is, under all the covers, about perpetuating SES. For them to think 'against' SES--even for the children's benefit--is contrary to decades of powerful conditioning. Another issue is that SES have made great profits in land and buildings, and much of this has been transferred to the St James organisations, which value SES would be entirely unwilling to relinquish. This is one of the most ironic aspects of an organisation started to promulgate Henry George's egalitarian doctrine of 'no private profit in land': SES have become greedy, and greedy for real estate. A full circle!


I realise that the teachers in the school and the governors and pretty much everyone in the SES is indoctrinated and that to let go of that or make the break will not be easy. I do think that the opportunity exists for anyone in St James of the SES to ask fundamental questions that may have been stifled before. I really hope that either on an organisational level or at least an individual level many of these people will take this opportunity. I hope they will take it as much for their own benefit as for the benefit of those in their charge or care.

I do find it highly amusing with the whole irony with regards to the economic principles that are espoused and the reality of their charitable status and their property portfolio today.


Free wrote:History has shown that with SES, no pressure, no progress. There should be no respite. It was interesting to re-read 'The Secret Cult' again, noting that in the prior uproar, one of the 4 existing schools closed almost immediately, and the other a year or two later, due to student withdrawals stemming from the adverse publicity. Withdrawals in the current situation won't be clear until late summer; if these are substantial then a PTA, more transparency on SES connections and doctrine, termination of abusing teachers and the appointment of independent Governors will become more likely outcomes.


Free wrote:In most places it is a slowly sinking ghost ship with grand premises, rapid attrition amongst new arrivals and an aging long term clientele wondering why they remain. This process is aided by growing internet access to more accurate information about the organisation's true nature, so that while persisting members still have trouble seeing and accepting what their organisation has become, at least everyone else is afforded a clear view.


When I say we should allow them time, I do not mean that we should not keep up the pressure. I agree without pressure the organisations will have no motivation to look beyond their comfort zone.

I think that the internet and forums like this will provide a persistent voice for the critics for all time until the organisations make the necessary changes and real actions are seen to be taken. This is a pressure that is revolutionary to a lot of organisations and it is clear that as yet neither the SES or St James understand it or treat it with respect that it requires. None of this will go away unless it is dealt with properly.

George
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Postby George » Fri Jun 09, 2006 4:36 pm

Free wrote:In most places it is a slowly sinking ghost ship with grand premises, rapid attrition amongst new arrivals and an aging long term clientele wondering why they remain. This process is aided by growing internet access to more accurate information about the organisation's true nature, so that while persisting members still have trouble seeing and accepting what their organisation has become, at least everyone else is afforded a clear view.


Interesting. Leon MacLaren said that such a philosopy school lasts for three generations. Assuming, for the sake of argument, this to be true, I had taken it to be himself, then X and then Y, but from what you say, perhaps it is Andrew MacLaren, Leon MacLaren, and Mr. Lambie.

But I think "rapid attrition of new arrivals" always was part of the game plan.

Free
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Joined: Wed Oct 19, 2005 9:30 pm

Postby Free » Fri Jun 09, 2006 10:26 pm

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Last edited by Free on Wed Oct 05, 2011 9:53 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Gandalf
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Postby Gandalf » Tue Jul 18, 2006 8:52 am

Stanton wrote:
Posted: Wed Mar 29, 2006 2:22 pm Post subject:

I would agree, Bonsai, that the School could be a lot clearer about its aims but I don't recognise that it is self-serving. If it was I wouldn't be interested. If it was, there would be no Art in Action. Do not the demonstrators feel looked after in ways they could hardly expect?


Granted Art in Action, when it takes place, is a nice event for a few days each year. So it should be given the huge effort that goes into it. Like the stately progress of a swan the 'sattwic atmosphere' involves constant underwater paddling to maintain momentum. It takes thousands of voluntary man hours and zillions of litres of petrol donated and consumed by the white middle class SES drones humming up and down from London to make it work.

SES 'aims' have shifted radically over time and are now nebulous to say the least but tracing the money is always a good place to start to see what an organisation actually does as opposed to what it says it does.
Looking at the Tracing the Money Trail string from a year or so ago could be a starting point.

The SES Constiitution, such as it is, is not really relevant in respect of the 'study of relation between men in society' which is a carry over from the original Andrew MacLaren economic concerns now long buried.

For over 40 years the SES view has always been that society is going down the toilet as part of the inevitable decline brought about by the rise of the Kaliyuga. For most the unspoken aim has been to put some distance between thamselves and 'ordinary' society at least for 361 days of the year - pace Art in Action - although that too is highly selective to ensure only 'conscious' art is displayed.

As far as a notional SES lifespan is concerned, as discussed elsewhere in this string, an ageing SES demographic points to an increasingly formulaic and stale approach where a vaguely Christian idea of 'doing good' replaces any real inquiry.

But then, when Lambie took over, he described himself to the Senior groups as 'just a caretaker' so, given that limiting causal sound his vision was always going to be at best, a nice repainting job. Now, after over a decade of being bowed and scraped to, Lambie may by now have forgotten his own sentence but it must inevitably still govern his thinking. No amount of pausing and tutoring will lead him to 'liberation' any more than it did MacLaren.

Alban
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Location: London

Postby Alban » Wed Jul 19, 2006 9:34 pm

Gandalf wrote:...But then, when Lambie took over, he described himself to the Senior groups as 'just a caretaker'...


Isn't that what Sir Huphrey suggested Jim Hacker say in his acceptance speech in the satirical and yet true-to-life comedy Yes (prime) Minister.

Alban


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