Debenham and Caldwell in New York

Discussion of the children's schools in the UK.
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bella
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Joined: Sat Mar 06, 2004 10:52 am

Postby bella » Fri Apr 02, 2004 3:43 pm

See previous comment re: confusion and contradiction over 19th century history. I may be the only one, but Misty and annoyed's comments didn't make it clear to me that they were studying 20th century history at a senior level.

I posted my opinion based on the information I could decipher, and what I had read at the St James website very recently - I'm sorry if I contributed to the atmosphere of misinformation somehow. In any case, the opinion I stated stands as a general view - thanks for your comment on that section, Misty.

adrasteia(can't sign in)

Re: Curriculum

Postby adrasteia(can't sign in) » Tue Apr 20, 2004 2:02 pm

Exasperated wrote:Why no geography? No time. The curriculum is over full already, with 10 lessons per day and verybody (bar the odd exception) doing 10 subjects for GCSE. Could be organised for A Level if there was enough demand.


Yes, but some schools offer geography as another option, not as yet another subject on the pile!
St. James is a small school and therefore cannot afford to provide the larger ranges of subjects options provided by other schools. This is fine as long as they offer the subjects you wish to study.
More subjects= more teachers= more money.
The girls school have just had an influx of new teachers so I don't think there's much more money available for new Geography teachers.

Alban
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Postby Alban » Thu Apr 29, 2004 10:10 am

I suppose it is all about what you consider important. I personally consider a reasonable understanding of geography as fairly fundamental - that way, if you get to be the President of a large super power, you don't make the mistake of not knowing where the country is that you're bombing!

The question of when to allow children to diversify is a difficult one to answer. On the one hand, it is clear that some are going to lean towards the sciences, some to the arts, and some to the humanities etc. On the other hand you would hate to take the opportunity away for them to learn a particular subject. When I was at St V. the answer was to crowbar all the students down one particular route and offer no choice, whereas the comprehansive I went to afterwards had plenty of choice, but wouldn't allow me to do computing and chemistry as they fell in the same periods (computing at that time wasn't the major subject it is today).

As for lack of resources, then I would be seriously concerned as a parent, if the school that my children were going to, couldn't afford to teach one of the core subjects. I would be asking myself what they spend their money on (sanskrit!?!), as there are certainly cheaper private schools out there. If this is seriously the case, then I would suggest that they combine the two schools (girls and boys) so that a greater choice can be offered, and core subjects can be taught. Either that, or they need to go back to daddy (the SES) and ask for more money!

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adrasteia
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Postby adrasteia » Fri Apr 30, 2004 2:06 pm

Alban wrote:As for lack of resources, then I would be seriously concerned as a parent, if the school that my children were going to, couldn't afford to teach one of the core subjects. I would be asking myself what they spend their money on (sanskrit!?!), as there are certainly cheaper private schools out there. If this is seriously the case, then I would suggest that they combine the two schools (girls and boys) so that a greater choice can be offered, and core subjects can be taught. Either that, or they need to go back to daddy (the SES) and ask for more money!


I think the Ses does help in a way, there is a group called the 'Friends of St. James' who helps raise money, who I think are basically Ses recruits.
I suppose you just wouldn't choose to go to St. James if they don't offer the subjects you wish to study. Although this may be harder if you have parent in Ses and began in the Junior School and later desided to leave. If you don't 'run the course' I think you are frowned upon, what I've picked up anyway. Although of course they do say 'St. James' doors will always be open' etc.
The Boys and Girls school do combine for the 6th form lessons on occasion -for example chemistry or economics- which is where most of the money for teachers has to be spent, that and GCSEs.

Guest

Postby Guest » Fri Apr 30, 2004 7:37 pm

adrasteia wrote:
Alban wrote:As for lack of resources, then I would be seriously concerned as a parent, if the school that my children were going to, couldn't afford to teach one of the core subjects. I would be asking myself what they spend their money on (sanskrit!?!), as there are certainly cheaper private schools out there. If this is seriously the case, then I would suggest that they combine the two schools (girls and boys) so that a greater choice can be offered, and core subjects can be taught. Either that, or they need to go back to daddy (the SES) and ask for more money!


I think the Ses does help in a way, there is a group called the 'Friends of St. James' who helps raise money, who I think are basically Ses recruits.
I suppose you just wouldn't choose to go to St. James if they don't offer the subjects you wish to study. Although this may be harder if you have parent in Ses and began in the Junior School and later desided to leave. If you don't 'run the course' I think you are frowned upon, what I've picked up anyway. Although of course they do say 'St. James' doors will always be open' etc.
The Boys and Girls school do combine for the 6th form lessons on occasion -for example chemistry or economics- which is where most of the money for teachers has to be spent, that and GCSEs.


Adrasteia, I am slowly getting a picture of how you may be connected to St James or have anything to do with the SES.

You are right-on in saying that if the subjects aren't available the pupils would simply leave. However, if you speak out what they would like to study, and if a large number of people are interested, they will try and recruit a teacher to teach it.

For instance, in the Girls school, we didn't used to have IT GCSE, we only recently started Philosophy (the proper one, the acuall A-level philosophy), next term we're going to have a new A-level geography teacher. As the number of pupils are increasing, so are the demands, and so teachers will always try and do their best to try and meet the demands.

Many people are very grateful to have done sanskrit, Alban. Employers and University admissioners are amazed by the fact that my friends have done Sanskrit. This is when they appreciate the school for teaching them Sanskrit. I haven't ever done Sanskrit, but I can tell you what I have learnt from others.

Tom Grubb
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Postby Tom Grubb » Sat May 08, 2004 9:16 pm

Guest wrote:I haven't ever done Sanskrit, but I can tell you what I have learnt from others.

What have you learnt from others about Sanskrit?


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