ST JAMES GIRLS

Discussion of the children's schools in the UK.
grimep
Posts: 48
Joined: Sun Jan 23, 2005 3:47 pm

Postby grimep » Fri Mar 04, 2005 7:35 am

Nietzsche wrote:I feel positively deprived - I have not sung "holy is gowinda", nor have I chanted meaningless Sanskrit prayers. I have missed those special nuances which make St. James so...."special". I feel incomplete as a human being..........Am I a terrible person?


Yes, you definitely are. And as a punishment you will be reincarnated as a lesser-mortal, probably living in poverty and ignorance... possibly in some sort of servile role to an SES soul who has been reincarnated with many riches. The suffering of the poor is punishment for their rejection of The Truth; so my advice to you would be to join the SES in haste and get singing Sanskrit rhymes before its too late.

daska
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Joined: Sat Jan 22, 2005 8:29 pm
Location: UK

Postby daska » Fri Mar 04, 2005 7:38 pm

I used my copy of it for the cat's tray

he didn't go for a week



(the author would like to assure all readers that no cats were harmed in the above humour)

sallyj
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Joined: Mon Apr 25, 2005 5:54 pm

St James Girls

Postby sallyj » Mon May 02, 2005 5:37 pm

I just wanted to say how much I agreed with everything Jojo has said. I too remember vividly those PE lessons with Chris Southwell and those bloody singing competitions with Mr Skinner.
I can remember shaking with fear and not being able to get a sound out o my mouth. I knew I couldn't sing well and he still made us all sing individually in front of everyone. It took me years to restore my confidence. I also can't believe more hasn't been said about Mrs Debenham, surely one of the scariest women around. I remember waiting to see who she would pick on that day and the relief if it wasn't you. I remember her lesson carrying on till 12.30 so we were all late for lunch, as no-one dared tell her what the time was. Mind you, I don't suppose we were that keen to sample the bread, cheese and squashy tomatoes AGAIN. I'm sure I saw one post about the skin on the yoghurt!!!

Daniel Gregory
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Joined: Mon Feb 07, 2005 8:12 pm

Postby Daniel Gregory » Wed May 04, 2005 9:24 pm

Hello girls,

AAAHH! The SES lunchtime diet!

Fruit; fair enough, good staple, usually ripe.
Yogurt; never could bring myself to try it. Was there anything under the skin or was it just skin?
Bread; brown and heavily wholemeal and blessed by the Atman.
Honey; only allowed off the spoon at first then, in a moment of weakness they allowed us to spread it on our bread and butter.
Celery; CCRUNCCHH.
Marmite; only permitted now and again until I struck a deal with David Hipshon... arrive on time to school for two weeks and it goes on the menu perminantly. I managed it but it nearly killed me!
Milk and Water; good stuff.

Have I missed/blanked out anything?

Daniel Gregory :eggface:

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erikdr
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Location: Amsterdam

Diet

Postby erikdr » Thu May 05, 2005 6:46 am

Have I missed/blanked out anything?


Not for the English version, as far as I know; my sample is of course very small, being two Waterperry A-in-A backstage weeks. But no, there IS one thing missing: usually we also had one type of cheese, had to be British (e.g. Stilton).

Now to supplement this with the Dutch SES version, of course both for lunch and dinner. Breakfast being very limited at the residentials, either because it was prescribed by the old Egyptian diet texts on which the whole bio-organic mess was based or because the fresh home-baking process (twice a day!) could obviously not be planned to guarantee fresh enough breakfast bread.

Remove: Marmite. Too British for us.
Add: At least 2-3 types of local Cheese, logical for cheeseheads like the Dutch.
Note that the yogurt, like the bread, was home-made. The leftover (day-fresh!) milk of day 1 would become the yogurt of day 2, with an accelerated conversion process based on heating. Hence the skins probably... :morning:

Happy to be back in normal (eating) life again, I guess - with the exception that later in my life I became vegetarian, and I still value that dimension of the SES diet whilst knowing that at home SES preaches a diet with lots of steaks etc...
With folded palms,

<Erik>

daska
Posts: 270
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Location: UK

Postby daska » Thu May 05, 2005 5:28 pm

A memory that's never left me: bits of butter floating in old cottage cheese pots full of water

...and smuggling that incredibly worthy organic sugar free pear and apple jam in marmite pots (because it looked like marmite)

sallyj
Posts: 6
Joined: Mon Apr 25, 2005 5:54 pm

St James Girls

Postby sallyj » Mon May 09, 2005 5:37 pm

going back to what Jojo was saying about the girl being singled out, this poor also had problems learning to read. I remember Miss Caldwell hauling her out to the front of the class to read an extract from the Bible I think (!), and shouting at her to tell her how stupid she was for not being able to read at the age of 8 or 9.

Thank goodness she left soon after and suprise suprise we heard that she was dyslexic. I dread to think what effect St.James had on her.

But as I remember, Mr Debenham particularly, refused to believe that dyslexia existed.

Not much more to say!!

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mike_w
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Postby mike_w » Mon May 09, 2005 7:45 pm

Daniel Gregory wrote:
Have I missed/blanked out anything?

Daniel Gregory :eggface:
yeah nuts occasionly & cheese by the pound...the only thing that seemed to have any protein in it...

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dottydolittle
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Postby dottydolittle » Mon May 09, 2005 7:46 pm

Daniel Gregory wrote:Hello girls,

AAAHH! The SES lunchtime diet!



For those of you who are in the UK, you may be familar with Jamie Oliver aka The Naked Chef and his quest to change the school dinners around the UK. This man certainly deserves a well-round applaud.

He goes around investigating the ready made meals: soggy chips, deep fried chicken nuggets that are being served in todays state schools. And tries to enforce a much healthy diet of salad, vegetables, and fresh meat. Unfortunately the problem is that the fresh meat makes the dinners rocket up in price, and so these schools who run on a budget rather take the unhealthy cheaper option.

I belive that the St James schools hold a good example in this aspect. Everything on the table is healthy and can suppot a balanced diet.

Some people would argue that meat is essential to the diet. However I would rather have a vegetarian healthy meal, than a unhealty 'meaty' one. Whats more is that, you can have your share of the meat in your diet when your at home.

Once upon a time as a naive pupil, I too used to complain about the food at St James.

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dottydolittle
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Postby dottydolittle » Mon May 09, 2005 7:55 pm

Daniel Gregory wrote:Have I missed/blanked out anything?
:



YOU forget, the baked potatoes, and the yummy tomato soup, the cheese maccaroni, the steamy hot rice with daal........



The Christmas dinner have got to be the best! The tomato sauce and cheesy bread bakes, crisps, squash drinks. But the decorations were the most brilliant, and the small candles on the tables. finally the mince pies... and if you are lucky with ice cream. after the meal... we would sing "We wish u a merry christmas" to the Ladies who made our lunch. and this would happen every year.

Goblinboy
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Postby Goblinboy » Tue May 10, 2005 1:24 am

dottydolittle wrote:Once upon a time as a naive pupil, I too used to complain about the food at St James.


Hello Little Missy. Nice to hear the voice of a more recent pupil again, albeit with a changed name. I think the topic of the merits of SES food in the past and today may deserve its own thread.

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a different guest
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Location: Australia

Postby a different guest » Tue May 10, 2005 10:39 am

Goblinboy wrote:Hello Little Missy. Nice to hear the voice of a more recent pupil again, albeit with a changed name. I think the topic of the merits of SES food in the past and today may deserve its own thread.


How about we call the thread "yoghurt and other delicacies"? and we could include in our discussion about how my relo's kids both suffer from anemia and are being force fed iron tablets.

Daniel Gregory
Posts: 13
Joined: Mon Feb 07, 2005 8:12 pm

Postby Daniel Gregory » Tue May 10, 2005 7:38 pm

Hello dottydolittle,
Baked potatoes? soup? macarroni cheese? rice?
You were spoilt!!

Goblinboy,
We could have a new thread about the SES diet but it might make us all ill if it's content extended beyond a page or two.

ADG,
Instead of calling it "yogurt and other delicacies" how about, "Is the yogurt puke and if we beat the bread for long enough could it be delicate?" !!!!!

Dan :icecream:

NYC
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Joined: Mon Feb 21, 2005 10:17 pm

Postby NYC » Tue May 10, 2005 8:15 pm

tell me...what is marmite? (sounds scary, makes me think of "parasite")
NYC

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dottydolittle
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Joined: Wed Aug 13, 2003 7:32 pm

Postby dottydolittle » Tue May 10, 2005 8:25 pm

NYC wrote:tell me...what is marmite? (sounds scary, makes me think of "parasite")
NYC


Have you ever tried those Twiglets?


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