St. James does NOT 'Recruit' Pupils into Funny Farm

Discussion of the children's schools in the UK.

Do You agree, with respect to St James 2006?

Poll ended at Thu Mar 02, 2006 6:13 pm

Yes
3
50%
No
3
50%
 
Total votes: 6

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Sam Hyde
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St. James does NOT 'Recruit' Pupils into Funny Farm

Postby Sam Hyde » Mon Feb 27, 2006 6:13 pm

Quote:
Could I also be given an accurate statistic of how many 6th formers are "offered" a place into the foundation course ? how many decline? and how many accept?[/quote]

Offered is the correct word here as I have been in 6th form for 2 years already, I have seen 3 age groups be able to join, In my first year in Lower 6th, there must have been about 40 of us Lower 6th ALONE. Out of all of us only about 10 joined. This remained the number, a few left, until summer '05 when they all left school. Recently, the new lower 6th has been invited to join the group, and only about 4 have taken this up. Thats 4 out of about 30. From the current upper 6th there are none I can think of, oh actually just 2 or so.
Hope this was of some use. It is an open invitation that only gets asked once, if you want to then you can, if you don?t then that?s just as good. Before any other readers of this post assume that it limits your opportunities in the school if you are not a member of the SES, then let me tell you, there are 4 head boys, none of them including myself are members of the SES. (I was though in winter'04-summer'05)

The O:
I utterly sympathize with The St Vedast and early St James pupils, I completely understand that they are enraged about the way that they were treated, but they have to realize that the school is a completely different place now, and they cannot continue badmouthing and misrepresenting the school and the SES now. Joining the SES is completely optional, not even all of the teachers are in the SES these days, they are not brainwashed and neither are we. I admit that joined the SES because my friends were joining, but the truth is that we have a laugh, the tutor lets us choose what we wish to speak about, we don't even need to need to turn up every week, we go to the pub with the tutors after the group and talk about whatever we want. The SES is not a cult, despite many thinking that they have all the characteristics of one, they now adopt a take it or leave it policy with the material.


I aim just to refresh your memory, parents, posters, students, noobies and oldies that there is no 'recruitment' by the girl's or boy's schools into the S.E.S. We are simply asked if we want to participate. The choice is entirely ours!
Before you get the wrong idea and presume that as a student who turns down this invitation, your prospects to succeed in the school are limited. There are 4 head boys, 2 Heads and 2 Deputies, I am the only one who was in the S.E.S, at that, I was not in this position during my time in funny farm. I have now left. Reasons being, I gave it a go, I achieved enlightenment, I broadened my horizons and now feel it is not for me.

Much love, :B-fly:
Sam xox
thats old now, like me, only 4 weeks to go!!!!!
"I've never let my schooling interfere with my education"

Justice
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St. James does NOT 'Recruit' Pupils into Funny Farm

Postby Justice » Mon Feb 27, 2006 6:45 pm

Dear Sam,

When you refer to the 'Funny Farm' I'm not entirely sure whether you are referring to the School of Economic Science or the various private and National Health Psychiatric units in central London.

This is a serious point by the way. I would be very interested to know how many people you have met, other than St. James Staff who have been members of the School of Economic Science for more than 5 years, after which time the experience and level of indoctrination that you experienced in your short time with them would be VERY different.

Depending on which Cult you are discussing, Health care professionals (i.e. Consultant Psychiatrists) tend to start seeing patients who are suffering from a range of Mental Health problems including severe depression, self-harm, feeling suicidal, severe anxiety, obsessive compulsive behaviour etc, after they have been involved with Cults for several years, in many cases. This includes people who have been involved with the SES.

You can dismiss this post or seek to trivialise it if you want to, but I am making a serious point.

How many people DO you know who have been in the SES for more than 5 years OUTSIDE of St. James?

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Sam Hyde
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Postby Sam Hyde » Mon Feb 27, 2006 6:52 pm

LOADS! I have spent my life around these kinds of people, you make a rather steep claim,
after they have been involved with Cults for several years, in many cases. This includes people who have been involved with the SES.

I feel it would do you JUSTICE to back this up with some evidence.
And the 'Funny Farm' is the S.E.S if my level of childish humour was too high for you to comprehend.
My dad never joined St James and had been at the S.E.S for MANY MANY years. Boddy was in SES for YEARS! before he was headteacher. I knwo these are not the best examples but believe me, after attending weeks and plays, parties, visits, the whole hog! I have had vast contact wiht S.E.S goers that are not part of St James.
Anyway the point is that the students at St James are NOT 'recruited' into the S.E.S to be married away as child brides or grooms for that matter!!!

Sam xox
thats old now, like me, only 4 weeks to go!!!!!

"I've never let my schooling interfere with my education"

Justice
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St. James does NOT 'Recruit' Pupils into Funny Farm

Postby Justice » Mon Feb 27, 2006 7:01 pm

OK, so just to be absolutely clear, are you saying that you have never met and never heard of ANYONE who has suffered Mental Health problems following involvement with the School of Economic Science?

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Sam Hyde
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Postby Sam Hyde » Mon Feb 27, 2006 7:03 pm

That is correct, not in my time!

St Vedast, yes but not S.E.S

Sam xox
thats old now, like me, only 4 weeks to go!!!!!

"I've never let my schooling interfere with my education"

Justice
Posts: 223
Joined: Fri Jan 27, 2006 11:13 pm

St. James does NOT 'Recruit' Pupils into Funny Farm

Postby Justice » Mon Feb 27, 2006 7:13 pm

OK, thanks. Have you ever read the book entitled 'SECRET CULT' by Peter Hounam and Andrew Hogg? The book describes their investigations into the School of Economic Science and St. James Schools in 1985.

As you may or may not know, the front cover of the book reads:

"A full expose of a strange and destructive organization that is penetrating the corridors of power"

james
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Location: Leeds (currently in NZ)

Postby james » Mon Feb 27, 2006 7:40 pm

I think ill change what I said. I had just got up. What I meant to post was a sensible argument.
This may of happened, but it happened to a very small minority. I know it happening at all is awful, but it seems to be shouted far too loud.
Why do we never hear about the good things the SES has done, because they certainly do happen.
Many people find the SES extremely beneficial. You can say "Oh their brainwashed", but really?
I feel the good the SES does these days out weighs the bad. I cannot comment on things before my time so I won't bother.
Last edited by james on Mon Feb 27, 2006 9:55 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Justice
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St. James does NOT 'Recruit' Pupils into Funny Farm

Postby Justice » Mon Feb 27, 2006 8:03 pm

James wrote:

LMFAO
That book sounds like a laugh. I will really have to give it a read. I mean ive certainly been destroyed by it. Im mentaly unstable and emotionaly cripled.


Well James, have a read of this and see how funny you find it:



PostPosted: Tue Jan 31, 2006 12:25 am Post subject: 'SECRET CULT' Introduction to the 1985 Book by Peter Hounam Reply with quote Edit/Delete this post
SECRET CULT (First published in 1985)

Peter Hounam and Andrew Hogg

Back Cover:

When the London Standard newspaper?s top investigative team began to look into the School of Economic Science, they met a wall of secrecy. What they found is a cause for public concern:

? Marriages are broken up, people brought close to breakdown.
? Schools educate their children in a religious philosophy their parents know nothing about.
? Political parties and churches are infiltrated by people hostile to their fundamental tenets.

All this is in the name of what claims to be a wholesome philosophy with Christian overtones. But in reality it is a strange, eccentric, essentially Eastern cult?

Introduction

The School

If religion were to be looked at as an industry, Britain?s record in producing new products seems dismal in recent times. Imports have arrived here from overseas ? the Moonies, Children of God, Scientology, Rajneesh ? all profiting from a gap in the market provided by the young, the lonely and the spiritually disaffected.

But the trade has not all been one way. Secretly, but with formidable efficiency and success, a wealthy religious cult ? British-born and-bred - has established a world-wide following. Its headquarters is in the heart of London?s fashionable Kensington district, and its name is the impeccable-sounding ?School of Economic Science?.

For nearly forty years this establishment, in keeping with its academic image, has offered to the general public night school courses in philosophy and economics. Many thousands of people from all walks of life have been through its doors, including barristers, housewives, policemen, students, journalists and labourers. Even a present British High Court Judge was a student for many years.

But despite its apparent respectability, in recent years the SES has found itself under attack, not just in Great Britain but in a number of other countries where offshoot branches have been started. Former members have claimed that the ?School? practises subtle brainwashing techniques to ensure absolute obedience. Its disciples put in many hours of unpaid work each week looking after the movement?s large property and holdings, and taking part in group activities. They are encouraged to isolate themselves from influences outside the movement, they are discouraged from discussing the School?s activities with non-members, and if they leave the movement they become pariahs to those that remain. The demands placed on members are so strong, it is claimed, that marriages fail, families split up, and some students develop serious mental problems.

The first mention of the cult appeared in Britain?s Daily Mail in 1968 when the paper investigated Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, the ?Beatles? Guru, who at one time had close links with the SES. The story mentioned the cult?s secrecy and the absolute obedience demanded from members ? but surprisingly it took the matter no further. And there the matter rested until the mid 1970s after the movement had opened for business in Malta. Opposition to them grew steadily on the island until eventually the Roman Catholic Church there produced a pamphlet warning of the dangers of the school. They claimed that, instead of offering a straightforward introduction to philosophy or economics, the movement was a cult, simply out for new members. This was a remarkably accurate summary.

At about the same time, The News of the World, the raciest Sunday newspaper in Britain, found a story which was right up their side of Fleet Street. A man in the north of England was complaining bitterly that he had lost his wife to a philosophy group. Following her enrolment at a local SES branch, the marriage had gone seriously wrong. Presuming, probably quite rightly, that their readers were not so very interested in the finer points of philosophy, The News of the World concentrated their attention on the unhappy marriage. Little mention was made of just what the woman had been studying which had altered her feelings for the disconsolate husband, who by then was suing for divorce. Tucked away on an inside page, the story attracted scant interest.

In 1982 the SES were once more in the news, this time in New Zealand where the well established Wellington branch had purchased for their activities a large mansion, something of a local landmark. Journalists who began to ask what the movement was all about soon stumbled on disgruntled former members. For the first time the word ?brainwashing? appeared in print to describe the cult?s activities.

Coincidentally The Standard newspaper in London was also in pursuit of this mysterious organisation. As investigative reporters we began to take an interest after hearing of a marriage break-up where the wife blamed the matrimonial problems on her husband?s involvement with the SES. The information we began to uncover was startling, so much so that it took more than a year of intensive research before the newspaper felt ready to publish.

We discovered a groundswell of very real concern about the SES. Several senior members of the Church of England were particularly forthright in their criticism, especially Michael Marshall, who at that time was Bishop of Woolwich. His concern stemmed from the early 1970s when, as Vicar of a central London church, part of his counselling ministry had been devoted to a number of former SES members. From his experience he considered the movement ?evil? and ?corrupt?, and at one time he even asked the Archbishop of Canterbury to issue a public warning about its dangers. His plea was met with silence.

Later we were to learn that as far back as 1977 the Society of Friends, better known as the Quakers, had banned the SES from using their large meeting-house in London?s Euston Road. They had been concerned over reports of members leaving the organisation with emotional or psychiatric disturbances, and had heard that the SES encouraged family rifts. When they met senior SES members to discuss these reports, they were further disenchanted with the secrecy surrounding the movement.

A number of organisations which investigate cults, such as Britain?s FAIR (Family Action, Information and Rescue) and another Christian group Deo Gloria Outreach, also had grave misgivings. Their suspicions were reflected on the other side of the Atlantic with the Toronto-based Council on Mind Abuse also expressing anxiety.

We learned that in recent years the movement had been investigated by the Special Branch of the British Police. Although they could find no evidence of illegality, we were told in private conversation of continuing disquiet about the movement?s activities.

As our research progressed we came to share all the fears and suspicions that had arisen. But the horror stories told by the many ex-members whom we contacted were not the full picture. We also grew to realize that SES members were playing key roles in several public organizations.

We discovered that the Chairman of the National Liberal Party, one of Britain?s major political parties, was a senior SES member, along with several of the party?s candidates at recent general elections. It also emerged that there were several vicars within the Church of England who had been members of the SES and appeared still to support the movement. And an official church organization, the European Christian Industrial Movement, which boasted the Archbishop of Canterbury?s chief of staff as president, consisted mainly of SES members.

Particularly worrying were the four children?s schools which the SES had set up in London. Ostensibly straightforward independent educational establishments, they introduced children to the rudiments of SES philosophy and encouraged senior pupils to join the movement. A sizeable number of parents knew nothing of the links between the SES and the schools, and some had noticed inexplicable character-changes in their children. A number of children were removed on the strength of The Standard?s stories.

As we prepared to publish our findings, the Dublin paper the Daily Independent carried a lengthy investigation into the activities of the SES in the Irish Republic. Following that article and the stories which appeared in Britain, the Dutch and Belgian press also took up the debate, and there was renewed press interest in New Zealand.

The only material the SES has ever published about itself for public consumption has been pamphlets aimed at recruiting new members, and letters to newspapers objecting to criticism. Neither give the remotest clue about the organisations true nature.

In this book we examine the hidden side of the School of Economic Science: its philosophy, its idiosyncratic practises, its growth world-wide. We report the claims of its critics, and the counter-claims of some members. But regrettably we cannot present the views of the cult?s mysterious leader, a former British barrister. He has consistently refused to be interviewed.

nilsabm
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Postby nilsabm » Mon Feb 27, 2006 9:22 pm

Perhaps the new pupils visiting this site ought to try reading some of the testimonies recorded on the experiences thread. They might then laugh less loudly at those with concerns on this forum.

daska
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Postby daska » Mon Feb 27, 2006 9:26 pm

james wrote:LMFAO
That book sounds like a laugh. I will really have to give it a read. I mean ive certainly been destroyed by it. Im mentaly unstable and emotionaly cripled.


That comment is offensive and you should apologise to Frith and the others immediately. How dare you laugh at children being made to feel suicidal. How dare you laugh at families being broken up.

Grow up or shut up.

james
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Postby james » Mon Feb 27, 2006 9:58 pm

Changed what I said.
I still believe the book is a bit extreamist, I havn't read it and I will try to. However from the exert / blurb that justice has provided it seems to focus soley on the negative and does therefore not provide a full and fair picture.
Im in a cult? You think? Don't worry the spaceships will be coming soon.

daska
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Postby daska » Mon Feb 27, 2006 10:14 pm

james - be a man and apologise

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non-conformist
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Re: St. James does NOT 'Recruit' Pupils into Funny Farm

Postby non-conformist » Mon Feb 27, 2006 10:14 pm

Sam Hyde wrote:...I aim just to refresh your memory, parents, posters, students, noobies and oldies that there is no 'recruitment' by the girl's or boy's schools into the S.E.S. We are simply asked if we want to participate. The choice is entirely ours!


Erm, WRONG!! If the choice is entirely ours, how come I was phoned up every four hours (no word of a lie), informed that there was a white dress for me to wear (!), not to mention the provision of flowers and the opportunity for someone to do my hair if only I would say "yes". How come these people refused to take no for an answer? How come I was made to feel like an outcast, friendless in the world, merely because I stood up for myself and refused to be duped into believing that my life would be enriched beyond belief if only I joined the foundation group? How do you explain the marriage balls and the hushed visits to the high throne of McL [shudder]? :bad-words:

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Sam Hyde
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Postby Sam Hyde » Mon Feb 27, 2006 10:54 pm

I can't say I am familliar with white dresses, but honnestly, Girls, Parents, the 'initiation ceremony' into foundation group has now BEEN ABOLISHED for new comers and is being reviewed.
We stirred such a shit storm Lambie's way in 2004/5 that with some persuasion from the top, it now ceases to be THANK FKIN GOD!
We gave them HELL over that.

Can you just clarify how long ago the hassling you describe took place, just so I can get an idea of how things have changed.....or not!

Sam xox
Last edited by Sam Hyde on Mon Feb 27, 2006 11:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.
thats old now, like me, only 4 weeks to go!!!!!

"I've never let my schooling interfere with my education"

james
Posts: 87
Joined: Mon Feb 20, 2006 10:14 pm
Location: Leeds (currently in NZ)

Postby james » Mon Feb 27, 2006 11:00 pm

Ok daska just for you, Im sorry for my heat of the moment post.
ive changed it now to what I really meant to say. Ill re-post it down here.

"Quote"
I think ill change what I said. I had just got up. What I meant to post was a sensible argument.
This may of happened, but it happened to a very small minority. I know it happening at all is awful, but it seems to be shouted far too loud.
Why do we never hear about the good things the SES has done, because they certainly do happen.
Many people find the SES extremely beneficial. You can say "Oh their brainwashed", but really?
I feel the good the SES does these days out weighs the bad. I cannot comment on things before my time so I won't bother.
Im in a cult? You think? Don't worry the spaceships will be coming soon.


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